The Greek Way
Title : The Greek Way
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0393310779
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 212 pages
Category : 18th-century
Tags : covers, art, crime, trauma, science-fiction, author

The books on The Greek Way Five hundred years before Christ in a little town on the far western border of the settled and civilizaed world, a strange new power was at work Athens had entered upon her brief and magnificent flowering of genius which so molded the world of mind and of spirit that our mind and spirit today are different What was then produced of art and of thought has never been Five hundred years before Christ in a little town on the far western border of the settled and civilizaed world, a strange new power was at work Athens had entered upon her brief and magnificent flowering of genius which so molded the world of mind and of spirit that our mind and spirit today are different What was then produced of art and of thought has never been surpasses and very rarely equalled, and the stamp of it is upon all the art and all the thought More at http://www.thephotoroll.com/php_uploads


The Greek Way (www.thephotoroll.com Reviews)

  • J.G. Keely
    J.G. Keely

    In the late Victorian, an eighteen year old Edith Hamilton graduated from Bryn Mawr College Enraptured by the spirit of Classical Antiquity, she did what any academic would and traveled to the center of Greek and Roman studies, Germany, to continue her education She was the first woman to attend classes in these great European colleges, though she could not pursue a degree, instead she had to audit, watching lectures from s specially built booth that screened her from the view of her classmate

  • Francisco H. Gonz├ílez
    Francisco H. González

    Llegu a este ensayo a trav s de una conferencia de Carlos Garc a Gual En t rminos Herodotianos, decir que este ensayo me ha parecido una maravilla.Llevo todo el mes de enero entregado a la lectura de los tr gicos griegos Esquilo aquel que despoj la guerra de toda gloria, aquel hombre que vio la vida tan dram ticamente que para expresarse, tuvo que inventar el drama , S focles y Eur pides, y este ensayo de Edith Hamilton 1867 1963 , que no hab a sido traducido al castellano hasta 2002, ha s

  • Evan
    Evan

    Edith Hamilton s prose reads like a disjointed and stilted school boy translation of ancient greek Plus, she s a snob and a hyperbolist Her books should be put on the trash heap with all the other Victorian bombasts If you want to learn why to love the ancients, go read a novel by Mary Renault.

  • Michael Finocchiaro
    Michael Finocchiaro

    Edith Hamilton is my favourite writer when it comes to describing ancient Greek mythology This is her first book where she tries to place the context of intellectual life in 5th C Athens from which so much influential poetry, theatre and philosophy will be born It feels like you are walking down the lane in front of the Parthenon with the plunging view of Athens seeing Socrates pass by with a gaggle of students around him, Aristophanes on the side of a building looking up at a flock of birds,

  • max
    max

    The disdain of professional classicists for Edith Hamilton is understandable but nevertheless unfair, since she never held herself out as a learned scholar or textual critic Instead, she simply took a great interest in communicating to a broader audience i.e the masses what it was that made Greek civilization worthy of our attention Hamilton was one of those enthusiasts who was simply in love with the Greeks, and that affection is evident on every page.She was, in short, a popularizer, an

  • Steven Sills
    Steven Sills

    I finished it months ago, but skimming over it to write my research project Hamilton is a classicist rather than a historian, although historians of Ancient Greece tend to be as familiar with Aeschylus as they are Thucydides Hamilton does know her history, but is rather bold if not reckless in her ideas which would probably get a circumspect response from a true historian The Athenians were the only civilization up to that time who loved life, she says All other civilizations, she says,

  • Rick Davis
    Rick Davis

    Chapters 5 14 of The Greek Way are excellent Edith Hamilton is at her best when sketching biographies of specific people She makes historical figures come alive as real humans by examining their writings as well as anecdotes told about them by their contemporaries One high point for me was the story of Socrates drinking everyone else under the table at the dinner party, and of him being ribbed by his companions about his shrewish wife Such moments make this book worthwhile for any student of

  • Austin Burbridge
    Austin Burbridge

    I have been re reading this, for the first time since high school It remains a splendid book Hard to imagine what could be better for the purpose of introducing the achievements of classical Greece to modern readers The author treats her subject with the clarity and brevity that comes from mastery She explains to the reader what was singular about the Greeks, and why it continues to matter to this day.When I had read it in high school, I had not favored it as much as I had H D F Kitto s T

  • Aaron Terrazas
    Aaron Terrazas

    Although it s sixty years old, this masterful little book brings ancient Greece to life and connects the core issues and questions that drove their lives to the issues and questions any thinking person struggles with today Hamilton masterfully integrates a long view of the ebb and flow of human thought with the specifics that drive us making each period unique She describes how in ancient Greece, for the first time in history, man was sufficiently secure to let go of the day to day concerns su

  • R.a.
    R.a.

    Alas, an old and decrepit copy Simply, a treatise on the greatness of the Ancient Greeks From this statement, Hamilton then proceeds to show the reader why we can say great She traces each big writer Aeschylus, Herodutus, Plato, etc and sets up a comparative with each Aeschylus with the other dramatists Herodutus with Thucydides and Xenophon, etc.But, the two most powerful arguments, I think, come at the beginning and the end the first setting in relief the difference between thinking

The Greek Way